A new readinglist 📚🦑

    • de Certeau, M. Practice of everyday life. (1992 ) at least: ‘General Introduction’ and ‘Making Do: Uses and Tactics’
    • Sloterdijk, Bubbels (1998)
    • Nanopolotics Handbook (2013)✔
    • Lather, P. Getting Lost: Feminist Efforts Toward a Double(d) Science (2007)
    • Castenedra, Teachings of Don Juan
    • Maitland, S. A Book of Silence
    • Jacques Rancière, “The Aesthetic Revolution”, in The Aesthetic Unconscious, (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2009)
    • Boaventura de Sousa Santos (ed.), Another Knowledge is Possible: Beyond Northern Epistemologies. 
    • Barthes, R. How to live together
    • Foucault, M. The order of discourse
    • Heidegger, M. Discourse of Thinking
    • Caputo, J. Hermeneutics: Facts and interpretation in the age of information (2018) ✔

Buddha at the Apocalypse

Reverse referencing: Tyranny of Structurelessness (Jo Freeman)

This text has been cited, edited, reprinted, cut and translated in many different contexts.  Its earliest version took form as a talk at the conference called by the Southern Female Rights Union in 1970, later it has been written down and often published without permission. Out of respect for Jo’s intellectual property, I will not copy her text onto my blog but offer you a window to her website which I will use for something I would call reverse-referencing. Rather most than sometimes things we read do not have a connection to just one single line of thought. In fact, to see thought as a line or a linear structure can in fact already be problematic for some types of knowledge. Referencing and footnoting might for that reason be among my favourite types of (academic) output. The ways these texts flow through the written output are hardly visible but for the writer, let’s try that in reverse for this text.

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My Christmas Reading List 🎄

  1. Florian Malzacher and Johanna Warsza, Empty Stages, Crowded Flats – Performativity as Curatorial Strategy. ✔️ (Berlin: Alexander Verlag – House on Fire Publication, 2017)
  2. (Douglas Hofstadter. Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. (1979) 1 chapter)
  3. John Dewey, Art as experience. (1934) Chapter 3 – an experience ✔️
  4. Derek Owens, Sustainable pedagogies. (1998) – preface ✔️ and chapter 2 ‘sustainability’ ✔️
  5. Jo Freeman’s, Tyranny of Structurelessness (1969?) ✔️
  6. Gilles Deleuze and Claire Parnet, Dialogues II, (1977) Chapter: A Conversation: What Is It? What Is It For? ✔️
  7. George Bataille, Unfinished systems of nonknowlege (2001) introduced by Stuart Kendall. (From this book I will read: Introduction✔️, Socratic college, Method of Meditation, Concequences of Nonknowledge, Nonknowledge and Rebellion, maybe some things that catch my interest while reading the book.)

Sarah Pierce – University of Glasgow (History of Art Research Seminar)

Attended: Wednesday 8th of November

Sarah Pierce (b. 1968) Lives and works in Dublin. Since 2003, Sarah Pierce has used the term The Metropolitan Complex to describe her art. Despite its institutional resonance, this title does not signify an organisation. Instead, it demonstrates Pierce’s broad understanding of cultural work, articulated through methods that open up to the personal and incidental. Characterised as a way to play with a shared neuroses of finding one’s place (read complex in the Freudian sense), whether a specific locality or a wider set of circumstances that frame interaction, her art considers forms of gathering, both historical examples and those she initiates. (…) The processes of research and presentation that Pierce undertakes highlight a continual renegotiation of the terms for making art: the potential for dissent and self-determination, the slippages between individual work and institution, and the proximity of past artworks. (…) Pierce has described her work as part of a feminist legacy, “deeply committed to a radical turn away from the cult of the artist and individual achievements towards the signs and symbols of a system of art making.”

Text from her website

 

My reaction to Sarah Pierce’s Lecture:
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