The Following doesn’t exist at The Occult Turn – insights

Earlier this year I was involved in the seminar The Occult Turn. Working from my project The Following doesn’t exist I supplied the seminar with a free and open WiFi by facilitating and allowing people to connect together through the WiFi spots, the project intends to practice generosity and to form an idiorhythmic community of ‘followers’ that, from this digital point of departure, are free to trail off wherever and whenever they wish.

The framework of the podcast platform is modelled after a study into the philosophy of fourth-century desert hermit mystics known as the Ammas or Desert Mothers and after dominant thinking in contemporary feminist methodology[1]. The reason to combine these streams of thinking and put them to use in a curatorial framework was to seek other ways of producing by problematising the universalising inclination of curating itself.  In doing so, committing to not only account for curatorial work through language but insisting on a situated and embodied understanding – such as a mystic ‘understanding’.

One of the speakers at the symposium, Kirsty Pattison, specifically addresses the links of ‘intelligent magic’ to Greek Theurgy, the religious ritual element of mid-platonic and neo-platonic philosophy. Theurgy is the practice through which one aims to establish a mystical union with God (‘the one’, or read: that which is bigger than us).

The Amma’s mystical practice grounded for a large part in neo-platonic philosophy – a popular philoshpy in Alexandria in the 5th and 6th century – sought this unification through a life of solitude and ritual in the deserts around Alexandria.

Slide from Kirsty’s presentation.

 

 

 

Although most of the research for The Following doesn’t exist focused on the Amma’s methods of living together, as both a small society and as individuals (idiorhythmic) and their ideas about silence and listening, theurgy has formed an important reason to look into the philosophy in the first place.

For the majority in today’s western society, a unification with ‘the one’ is not directly on top-priority on the list of things to do on a daily basis, exactly because God’s death[2] made our daily lives more important to us than our promised afterlives. But as I noted above, ‘the one’ might also be read as ‘that which is bigger than us’ – and there is a whole lot of that still; climate change, the rise of big data and geopolitical turmoil.

 

Then, the turn to the occult is a combination of embodied forms of understanding while being a way of letting ‘the other’ speak.
(Federici)

 

“Escape happens”, as Eugene Thacker notes in his first volume of the horror philosophy series.

[1] A simple read about the Amma’s can, of course, be found on Wikipedia

[2]  That’s Nietzsche obvs.

Reverse referencing: Tyranny of Structurelessness (Jo Freeman)

This text has been cited, edited, reprinted, cut and translated in many different contexts.  Its earliest version took form as a talk at the conference called by the Southern Female Rights Union in 1970, later it has been written down and often published without permission. Out of respect for Jo’s intellectual property, I will not copy her text onto my blog but offer you a window to her website which I will use for something I would call reverse-referencing. Rather most than sometimes things we read do not have a connection to just one single line of thought. In fact, to see thought as a line or a linear structure can in fact already be problematic for some types of knowledge. Referencing and footnoting might for that reason be among my favourite types of (academic) output. The ways these texts flow through the written output are hardly visible but for the writer, let’s try that in reverse for this text.

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My Christmas Reading List 🎄

  1. Florian Malzacher and Johanna Warsza, Empty Stages, Crowded Flats – Performativity as Curatorial Strategy. ✔️ (Berlin: Alexander Verlag – House on Fire Publication, 2017)
  2. (Douglas Hofstadter. Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. (1979) 1 chapter)
  3. John Dewey, Art as experience. (1934) Chapter 3 – an experience ✔️
  4. Derek Owens, Sustainable pedagogies. (1998) – preface ✔️ and chapter 2 ‘sustainability’ ✔️
  5. Jo Freeman’s, Tyranny of Structurelessness (1969?) ✔️
  6. Gilles Deleuze and Claire Parnet, Dialogues II, (1977) Chapter: A Conversation: What Is It? What Is It For? ✔️
  7. George Bataille, Unfinished systems of nonknowlege (2001) introduced by Stuart Kendall. (From this book I will read: Introduction✔️, Socratic college, Method of Meditation, Concequences of Nonknowledge, Nonknowledge and Rebellion, maybe some things that catch my interest while reading the book.)

Radical Pedagogies – Ana S. Gonzalez Rueda

On the 28th of October, I attended a workshop by Ana S. Gonzalez Rueda titled: ‘Unknowing and other ways of learning with art’. The workshop brought the material of her PhD thesis (Radical Pedagogies and Curating) to a practical environment in the form of a workshop at the CCA. Gonzalez’s main focus was on how the pedagogical is inherent in the exhibition space rather than something imposed on it. The aim Gonzalez defined for her PhD was to supply the tools from ‘the educational’ for people operating in the exhibition space (curators and artists), functioning as the mediator between pedagogical theory and the theory and praxis of exhibition making. This process is specifically interesting to approach within the CCA (Glasgow), as this institution doesn’t have an ‘educational department’ (or another organ with a different name but similar mediating activities). Gonzalez’s approach to the outline of this research, by using the workshop-form, gave way to others in the process of defining and testing the line of thinking which is daring for a PhD research but an inseparable practice when researching the educational.

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Word / Mouth on Instagram

From our reflection:

The ‘Word/Mouth body’ was formed for the event; this attracted curiosity and opened up the dialogue to interested wider audiences. The body consisted of the group, the artist and our methods of communication. The group communicated about our process and ideas through our network. The identity was also followed through on Instagram as a platform as our main social platform. The instagram functioned as a way to test and share ideas or references that did not have feature in the publication and as a way to visualise how these ideas were flowing between the members of the group.

 

@katherineamurphy ‘s awe, #embodiment 🕳 #voiceandpresence

A post shared by Word / Mouth (@wordmouth.gsa) on

The following needs more thinking: How can existing media be used in creating a single voice from a polyphonic construction.