Epicurus

TEXT 78: Aetius 1.20.2 = Dox.Gr. p. 318 (271 U)

Epicurus [says that] void, place, and space differ [only] in name.

I stumbled on Epicurus’ writings (or rather those of his students) in one of these silly millennial ways. When looking for an image of a bust on Google images, I was lucky to be curious enough to read further.

It is not often that I find an ancient writing of which I think ‘I should really get into this’ (except for a weakness for Socrates). Usually, books that I get very enthusiastic about are not written and published earlier than 2010, or in some philosophical cases before 1980. But how to get into Epicurus’ writing through the available pocket publications specifically translated (curated) in order to indeed seem that fresh to me – mainly by putting his philosophy under a big umbrella of ‘how to find happiness in your contemporary life with ancient writing [read: ancient writing = very intelligent connotations]’. Which might even ironically be ‘influenced’ by Foucault’s work on subjectivity (or life as a work of art). Of course, I’m not of the philosophical type that is about getting the gist, a concise meaning reached through close examination of details in the writing and their relationship with the whole that can thereby be considered true, of a certain ‘original’ text. However, I’d like to be able to see the differences, gaps and incompatibility of such an original text with the experience of my time. That is where my philosophical friends often show a mixture of admiration and frustration when talking to me about my interpretations: they are only focused on a part and usually interested in where the text unintentionally rebels against itself by being preserved to this time. How do I solve this? I get the most boring, unaesthetic publishing of his writing, based on the table of contents and a little bit of intuition.

So as soon as I’ve read about friendship and common support structures, ataraxia – the peace and freedom from fear and early ideas of voids and particles that make up our material reality, I will come back with how that could all connect with contemporary curating of contemporary art.

coming up: Epicurating? – ‘curatorial rambling on friendship, support and falling’

Nancy Adajania and Ranjit Hoskote – Chapter Thirteen, Glasgow

On the 23th of November Chapter Thirteen hosted a lecture by Nancy Adajania and Ranjit Hoskote. Benjamin Fallon, part of Chapter Thirteen, introduces the intention of inviting these speakers to Glasgow with an explanation on why Chapter Thirteen was founded in the first place, to counter the perfunctory institutional methods and to include new voices in this process. Nancy Adajania and Ranjit Hoskote research exactly these processes in what they call the nth field, the non-static complex transcultural exchange.[1]

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Sarah Pierce – University of Glasgow (History of Art Research Seminar)

Attended: Wednesday 8th of November

Sarah Pierce (b. 1968) Lives and works in Dublin. Since 2003, Sarah Pierce has used the term The Metropolitan Complex to describe her art. Despite its institutional resonance, this title does not signify an organisation. Instead, it demonstrates Pierce’s broad understanding of cultural work, articulated through methods that open up to the personal and incidental. Characterised as a way to play with a shared neuroses of finding one’s place (read complex in the Freudian sense), whether a specific locality or a wider set of circumstances that frame interaction, her art considers forms of gathering, both historical examples and those she initiates. (…) The processes of research and presentation that Pierce undertakes highlight a continual renegotiation of the terms for making art: the potential for dissent and self-determination, the slippages between individual work and institution, and the proximity of past artworks. (…) Pierce has described her work as part of a feminist legacy, “deeply committed to a radical turn away from the cult of the artist and individual achievements towards the signs and symbols of a system of art making.”

Text from her website

 

My reaction to Sarah Pierce’s Lecture:
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