Diagram for Structureless Project Developement 🕸


This diagram is a web-preview. For the full high-resolution image go to ‘Files‘. This diagram was part of the ‘sandbox studio’ research.

According to Maria Lind: ‘the better curatorial programs help students acquire a discourse with which to talk about curating and a good network which at best becomes a peer group, however no program has the resources or facilities to help form a method, which is the most essential part of this applied form of articulation’, that is curatorial practice.

In creating a personal methodology for my wish to work comfortably within complexity, I looked into curricular development in primary education. While some academics advocate the introduction of experiential learning to post-secondary education and even doctoral research, this type of learning is, not unsurprisingly, best developed and described for the early stages of education. Based on ‘van de Akker’s Web’ for innovating curricular development, I created a similar web translated to fit the conditions of a curatorial or artistic practice. Within the context of the ‘sandbox studio’ research project, I subject this diagram as a temporary structure to tests by my peers and cross-disciplinary proffesionals. The diagram intends to step away from linear project-based development, as learning and creative practice do not reflect this linearity. Although many questions in the diagram may be familiar and may occur in several parts of conventional project development, the diagram visualises how these questions hang together, how they are interdependent on each other. In this way the diagram allows one to start from unforeseen angles while remaining able to assess the process.

Using the diagram: 

The diagram consists of two different elements – the heart (vision) and the radials (aspects). The ‘vision’ for a mapped project is determined by the user of the diagram, this can be any more or less defined ideology, concept, feeling or intention to guide a project.
The different radials of the web represent a gradual scale to map ‘focus’ in the direction of one of the named aspects. The related questions (shown in one version of the map) help to think about how to outline the ‘focus’ of a project or an activity onto the different radials of the web. The aspects opposite each other in the diagram are oppositions or are interdependent. The aspects in approximation to each other are related.
Once filled out, the shape created is that of a ‘bubble’, (filled with the breath of its creator). As
 in nature, the most sustainable bubble is perfectly spherical and thus directs the shape a project should strive for. Any humps and dents in the non-spherical shape can now be acted upon. Mapping activities on the diagram, instead of setting a project out beforehand, slowly results in the collection of these activities adding up to a project.


Nanopolitics Handbook (2013)

A new readinglist 📚🦑

(under construction)

    • de Certeau, M. Practice of everyday life. (1992 )at least: ‘General Introduction’ and ‘Making Do: Uses and Tactics’
    • Sloterdijk, Bubbels (1998)
    • Nanopolotics Handbook (2013)
    • Lather, P. Getting Lost: Feminist Efforts Toward a Double(d) Science (2007)

Buddha at the Apocalypse

Reverse referencing: Tyranny of Structurelessness (Jo Freeman)

This text has been cited, edited, reprinted, cut and translated in many different contexts.  Its earliest version took form as a talk at the conference called by the Southern Female Rights Union in 1970, later it has been written down and often published without permission. Out of respect for Jo’s intellectual property, I will not copy her text onto my blog but offer you a window to her website which I will use for something I would call reverse-referencing. Rather most than sometimes things we read do not have a connection to just one single line of thought. In fact, to see thought as a line or a linear structure can in fact already be problematic for some types of knowledge. Referencing and footnoting might for that reason be among my favourite types of (academic) output. The ways these texts flow through the written output are hardly visible but for the writer, let’s try that in reverse for this text.

Continue reading “Reverse referencing: Tyranny of Structurelessness (Jo Freeman)”

Curatorial Conciousness 1.2 – The Story of the Falling Curator

This point and click game was played while reading a statement called ‘Curatorial Consciousness’ describing the development of personal ideas regarding ‘the curatorial’ thereby being about the curatorial and itself curatorial in the sense that it takes form as a constellation of ideas.

Performed 28-11-2017 at Glasgow School of Art – Curatorial Practice presentations to MFA

Well, I guess these kind of presentations already raise one question.
Are we allowed to show unrealized projects as part of our practice?
Whereas while they may not have been part of an artistic discourse,
They have very well been part of a personal artistic development.

Continue reading “Curatorial Conciousness 1.2 – The Story of the Falling Curator”


TEXT 78: Aetius 1.20.2 = Dox.Gr. p. 318 (271 U)

Epicurus [says that] void, place, and space differ [only] in name.

I stumbled on Epicurus’ writings (or rather those of his students) in one of these silly millennial ways. When looking for an image of a bust on Google images, I was lucky to be curious enough to read further.

It is not often that I find an ancient writing of which I think ‘I should really get into this’ (except for a weakness for Socrates). Usually, books that I get very enthusiastic about are not written and published earlier than 2010, or in some philosophical cases before 1980. But how to get into Epicurus’ writing through the available pocket publications specifically translated (curated) in order to indeed seem that fresh to me – mainly by putting his philosophy under a big umbrella of ‘how to find happiness in your contemporary life with ancient writing [read: ancient writing = very intelligent connotations]’. Which might even ironically be ‘influenced’ by Foucault’s work on subjectivity (or life as a work of art). Of course, I’m not of the philosophical type that is about getting the gist, a concise meaning reached through close examination of details in the writing and their relationship with the whole that can thereby be considered true, of a certain ‘original’ text. However, I’d like to be able to see the differences, gaps and incompatibility of such an original text with the experience of my time. That is where my philosophical friends often show a mixture of admiration and frustration when talking to me about my interpretations: they are only focused on a part and usually interested in where the text unintentionally rebels against itself by being preserved to this time. How do I solve this? I get the most boring, unaesthetic publishing of his writing, based on the table of contents and a little bit of intuition.

So as soon as I’ve read about friendship and common support structures, ataraxia – the peace and freedom from fear and early ideas of voids and particles that make up our material reality, I will come back with how that could all connect with contemporary curating of contemporary art.

coming up: Epicurating? – ‘curatorial rambling on friendship, support and falling’

My Christmas Reading List 🎄

  1. Florian Malzacher and Johanna Warsza, Empty Stages, Crowded Flats – Performativity as Curatorial Strategy. ✔️ (Berlin: Alexander Verlag – House on Fire Publication, 2017)
  2. (Douglas Hofstadter. Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. (1979) 1 chapter)
  3. John Dewey, Art as experience. (1934) Chapter 3 – an experience ✔️
  4. Derek Owens, Sustainable pedagogies. (1998) – preface ✔️ and chapter 2 ‘sustainability’ ✔️
  5. Jo Freeman’s, Tyranny of Structurelessness (1969?) ✔️
  6. Gilles Deleuze and Claire Parnet, Dialogues II, (1977) Chapter: A Conversation: What Is It? What Is It For? ✔️
  7. George Bataille, Unfinished systems of nonknowlege (2001) introduced by Stuart Kendall. (From this book I will read: Introduction✔️, Socratic college, Method of Meditation, Concequences of Nonknowledge, Nonknowledge and Rebellion, maybe some things that catch my interest while reading the book.)