Curatorial Concioussness – level up! ⬆️

The statement

Approaching ‘every project’ as an ecology one could hardly still call it ‘a project’. By breaking with common aspects of the project, such as its temporality and its input-outcome relationship, my practice produces forms that are more open and comfortable towards complexity and confusion but are at the same time more compatible with the many ways in which we learn, think and play. My process balances tactics like getting into a flow and getting lost, as I see them as each other’s productive counterpart.

I am an artist with a curatorial practice, adopting the role of the curator to directly fall from it, which gives my practice a crossover characteristic. I am committed to creating horizontal structures that facilitate collaborative spheres for cross-disciplinary learning. Spheres, in which I focus on ties and bounds, information and resources, to make my practice inherently sustainable rather than concentrated on its intrinsic logic.

Informed by an interest in learning innovations, grounded in the experience of being educated within an innovative curriculum that formed my awareness about the act of learning itself, I employ pedagogical tactics and theories within my process. This usually results in long-term investments in certain ideas and subjects resulting in a doubled practice where learning is both the producing and that which is produced. To communicate this doubled outcome, I develop ways, materials and tools that feed into new investments. As such, I appropriate methods coming from social design, but having them informed by non-linear structures we encounter around us, like digital networks, chaotic processes to form playful tactics. The array of forms resulting from this approach, deploy action-based, discursive and performative techniques that support and sustain this ecological process.

Version: 2018.05.01

Visual Method for Non-linear Project Developement 🕸

 

This diagram is a web-preview. For the full high-resolution image go to ‘Files‘. This diagram was part of the ‘sandbox studio’ research.

According to Maria Lind: ‘the better curatorial programs help students acquire a discourse with which to talk about curating and a good network which at best becomes a peer group, however no program has the resources or facilities to help form a method, which is the most essential part of this applied form of articulation’, that is curatorial practice.

In creating a personal methodology for my wish to work comfortably within complexity, I looked into curricular development in primary education. While some academics advocate the introduction of experiential learning to post-secondary education and even doctoral research, this type of learning is, not unsurprisingly, best developed and described for the early stages of education. Based on ‘van de Akker’s Web’ for innovating curricular development, I created a similar web translated to fit the conditions of a curatorial or artistic practice. Within the context of the ‘sandbox studio’ research project, I subject this diagram as a temporary structure to tests by my peers and cross-disciplinary proffesionals. The diagram intends to step away from linear project-based development, as learning and creative practice do not reflect this linearity. Although many questions in the diagram may be familiar and may occur in several parts of conventional project development, the diagram visualises how these questions hang together, how they are interdependent on each other. In this way the diagram allows one to start from unforeseen angles while remaining able to assess the process.

Using the diagram: 

The diagram consists of two different elements – the heart (vision) and the radials (aspects). The ‘vision’ for a mapped project is determined by the user of the diagram, this can be any more or less defined ideology, concept, feeling or intention to guide a project.
The different radials of the web represent a gradual scale to map ‘focus’ in the direction of one of the named aspects. The related questions (shown in one version of the map) help to think about how to outline the ‘focus’ of a project or an activity onto the different radials of the web. The aspects opposite each other in the diagram are oppositions or are interdependent. The aspects in approximation to each other are related.
Once filled out, the shape created is that of a ‘bubble’, (filled with the breath of its creator). As
 in nature, the most sustainable bubble is perfectly spherical and thus directs the shape a project should strive for. Any humps and dents in the non-spherical shape can now be acted upon. Mapping activities on the diagram, instead of setting a project out beforehand, slowly results in the collection of these activities adding up to a project.

Nanopolitics Handbook (2013)

A new readinglist 📚🦑

(under construction)

    • de Certeau, M. Practice of everyday life. (1992 ) at least: ‘General Introduction’ and ‘Making Do: Uses and Tactics’
    • Sloterdijk, Bubbels (1998)
    • Nanopolotics Handbook (2013)
    • Lather, P. Getting Lost: Feminist Efforts Toward a Double(d) Science (2007)
    • Castenedra, Teachings of Don Juan
    • Maitland, S. A Book of Silence
    • Jacques Rancière, “The Aesthetic Revolution”, in The Aesthetic Unconscious, (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2009)
    • Boaventura de Sousa Santos (ed.), Another Knowledge is Possible: Beyond Northern Epistemologies. 
    • Barthes, R. How to live together
    • Foucault, M. The order of discourse
    • Heidegger, M. Discourse of Thinking

Buddha at the Apocalypse

Reverse referencing: Tyranny of Structurelessness (Jo Freeman)

This text has been cited, edited, reprinted, cut and translated in many different contexts.  Its earliest version took form as a talk at the conference called by the Southern Female Rights Union in 1970, later it has been written down and often published without permission. Out of respect for Jo’s intellectual property, I will not copy her text onto my blog but offer you a window to her website which I will use for something I would call reverse-referencing. Rather most than sometimes things we read do not have a connection to just one single line of thought. In fact, to see thought as a line or a linear structure can in fact already be problematic for some types of knowledge. Referencing and footnoting might for that reason be among my favourite types of (academic) output. The ways these texts flow through the written output are hardly visible but for the writer, let’s try that in reverse for this text.

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Curatorial Conciousness 1.2 – The Story of the Falling Curator

This point and click game was played while reading a statement called ‘Curatorial Consciousness’ describing the development of personal ideas regarding ‘the curatorial’ thereby being about the curatorial and itself curatorial in the sense that it takes form as a constellation of ideas.

Performed 28-11-2017 at Glasgow School of Art – Curatorial Practice presentations to MFA

Well, I guess these kind of presentations already raise one question.
Are we allowed to show unrealized projects as part of our practice?
Whereas while they may not have been part of an artistic discourse,
They have very well been part of a personal artistic development.

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